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Sears.ca>Resource Centre>Buying Guides>Baby> Gliders Buying Guide

Gliders Buying Guide

A glider, also known as a glider chair or glider rocker, has a unique place in the nursery because it’s designed with grown-up comfort in mind.

 
 

A glider is a truly versatile piece of baby furniture; while babies love the soothing back and forth motion, you’ll enjoy having a comfy, supportive place to relax while feeding the baby, reading a story or getting her to sleep. And as a bonus, once your baby has outgrown her nursery setting, you can move your glider to the living room, den or home office.

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Glider vs. Rocking Chair

The nursery rocking chair has a classic charm to it, yet more and more, parents are choosing modern glider chairs. And it's not that big of a switch. A glider is really just an updated rocking chair, but instead of rocking, it slides on a platform almost effortlessly. It is also safer since it sits flat on the floor so children and pets don't have to worry about getting toes or tails pinched under the rockers. For added security you can get gliders that have a locking mechanism, keeping curious little fingers safe. Rocking chairs do have the advantage that they don't have any moving parts that could wear out. Ultimately it comes down to what you feel most comfortable in.


Comfort

When you add up all feedings, stories and bedtimes, you'll be spending many, many hours in your glider, so you want to be sure it's comfortable. Seat sizes and heights differ, so look for one that lets your feet touch the ground, is tall enough so you can rest your head, is wide enough for you, baby and a nursing pillow, and supports your arms comfortably. The padding on the back and seat should be thick, yet comfy. And make sure you can get in and out of the glider easily with your hands full, since you'll be most likely holding the baby.


Well-Made

Buying a glider is an investment, so you don't want one that will be falling apart after a few months. Take a glider for a test drive. See if the gliding movement is smooth all the way through. Check the glue joints for weak spots and to see if the chair will withstand basic shaking, leaning and gliding. Also, is the rocking mechanism covered or hard for little fingers to reach? Last but certainly not least, is it quiet? A little squeak in the store will become a big annoyance once you have to listen to it over and over, night after night.


Easy to Clean

Accidents and babies go hand in hand, so look for gliders with fabrics that can be spot-cleaned or are dark enough to hide stains. You can also get a glider with removable cushions or cushion covers that can go into the washing machine.