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Sears.ca> Sears Canada Charitable Foundation

Sears Canada Charitable Foundation

Making a difference in the lives of children struggling with cancer is our passion. We’re committed to raising awareness and providing funds for research and treatment so that we can make childhood cancers a thing of the past.

We are working with children’s oncology centres and organizations such as:

  • The Hospital for Sick Children (Toronto)
  • Operation Enfant Soleil (Quebec City)
  • BC Children’s Hospital (Vancouver)
  • IWK Health Centre (Halifax)
  • Stollery Children’s Hospital (Edmonton)
  • Janeway Hospital (St. John’s)
  • Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (Ottawa)

This is possible through support
from our associates and customers like you.

“Sears Canada has been involved in supporting communities across Canada where we do business for all of our 58 years. In that time, Sears has developed meaningful relationships with many organizations helping children reach their potential in safe and healthy environments. In recent years this has included raising awareness and financial support for children impacted by cancerand their families. Sears, on behalf of its generous customers and associates, is proud to be investing in the health of children across the country.”

Donations to Sears Children’s Cancer Charities are administered and distributed through the Sears Canada Charitable Foundation. The Sears Canada Charitable Foundation is a registered Canadian charity established to collect and distribute donations to charitable organizations that support Sears Canada’s community investment mandate, including a focus on the health of children and youth.

–Calvin McDonald, President and CEO, Sears Canada Inc.

“We know the hospital experience can have a significant impact on children and families dealing with cancer and blood disorders, which is why we focus so much on family-centred care. The Sears Cancer Clinic will make a real difference for our patients and families. We are grateful to our many donors in the community whose support helps us provide world-leading haematology and oncology treatment.”

-Mary Jo Haddad, President and CEO, The Hospital for Sick Children

“Thank you Sears for your tireless dedication in creating a better world for children with cancer. Your generosity is helping to make a positive difference in the lives of children in BC and their families.”

-Kirk R. Schultz, MD, Head,
Michael Cuccione Foundation Childhood Cancer Research Program at BC Children’s Hospital and the Child & Family Research Institute

 

Did you know?

In 2010, Sears Canada Charitable Foundation made a multi-year, $5 million commitment to fight childhood cancer. Half is being directed towards the completion of Sears Cancer Clinic - a state-of-the-art cancer clinic in Toronto that sees 25 per cent of all new cases of pediatric cancer in Canada and 60 per cent of all cases in Ontario. The remainder is being directed to support The Sears Childhood Cancer Fellowship.

SickKids provides a full range of treatments for children requiring the most complex cancer treatments: chemotherapy, surgery, radiation, bone marrow transplantation and palliative care. It is the only children’s hospital in Ontario that provides bone marrow transplantation.

Children and families across British Columbia continue to benefit from the generosity of Sears Canada. Sears’ contributions to childhood cancer care and research are helping to make cancer treatments safer, minimizing the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation, and supporting families through programs that provide the absolute best care for children.

 

Why donate?...

Cancer is the most common cause of non-accidental death in Canada’s children beyond the newborn period.

While the causes of adult cancers include environmental, occupational and lifestyle factors, including diet, alcohol and smoking, the causes of childhood cancers are, in most cases, unknown.

The types of cancers that occur in children vary greatly from those seen in adults. They tend to occur in different parts of the body, they look different under the microscope and they respond differently to treatment. More research is needed.

In the early 1950s, less than 10 percent of childhood cancer patients could be cured. Today, more than 70 percent of children diagnosed with cancer become long-term survivors and the majority of them are considered cured. However, the long-term effects of cancer treatments such as blindness, brain damage and ongoing learning and emotional disabilities can affect these children’s futures in a profound way. Long-term support programs are in vital need.